OFFICIAL VOICE OF THE COMMUNIST PARTY OF CUBA CENTRAL COMMITTEE
The explosions of the ship La Coubre (pictured) and Cubana Airlines Flight 455 over Barbados are two of the most tragic events suffered by our people, repeatedly victimized by terrorism. Photo: José Agraz

* Excerpts from a speech by Eduardo Galeano, delivered in December of 2001, upon receiving an Honorary Doctorate from the University of Havana:
“Thirty years ago, thinking about the attitude of the United States government, I asked myself what prohibits its citizens from traveling freely to Cuba: If this island is what they say, hell, why doesn’t the United States organize excursions here so that their citizens can see it themselves and wise up?
“I continue to ask, today.
“Ten years ago, I formulated another question about the vilification of Cuba: How am I going to confuse the country with hell, if I’ve never confused it with heaven?
“I continue to ask, today.
“Neither hell, nor heaven: The Revolution, a product of this world, is dirty with human clay, and precisely because of this, not despite this, it continues to be contagious.
“These times in which we are living are not, let’s say, very honorable. It would appear that we are competing in the World Cup of Doormats. One has the impression, and I hope it is a mistaken impression, that governments are competing to see who can best crawl on the floor, and who can allow themselves to be stepped on with the greatest enthusiasm. This competition is longstanding, but since the terrorist attacks of September 11, unanimity almost exists in subordination to the world’s masters.
I say almost. And today, I say that I am proud to receive this distinction in the country that has most clearly dotted the “i” – saying no to the impunity of the powerful, the country that has most firmly and lucidly refused to accept the sort of safe passage afforded the masters of war, who, in the name of the struggle against terrorism, can practice at will all the terrorism that may occur to them, bombing whoever they like, killing whenever they like, and how many they like. In a world in which being servile is a virtue, in a world in which everyone is for sale, for rent, hearing the voice of dignity is rare. Cuba is, once again, the source of this voice.
This Revolution, harassed, blockaded, slandered, has done less than what it wanted, but has done much more than it could. And is immersed precisely in this.
The Revolution continues to commit the dangerous lunacy of believing that human beings are not condemned to humiliation.