Hundreds of people have been arrested, beaten, tortured and subjected to mistreatment following the elections. Photo: Prensa Latina

TEGUCIGALPA.–A group of UN and Inter-American Court of Human Rights rapporteurs condemned the killing of at least 12 people and the detention of hundreds of citizens who protested against the results of the presidential elections issued by the Supreme Electoral Tribunal (TSE) of Honduras last Sunday.

The experts presented a report in Geneva, in which they warned of the critical political and social situation that the Central American country is experiencing and called on the national government to respect the human rights and life of Hondurans.

The document highlighted that street protests and unrest are not exceptional situations and do not justify the suspension of fundamental rights.

The Opposition Alliance against the Dictatorship in Honduras called this Wednesday morning for a series of national protests and mobilizations against the recent killings and repression and what they consider “fraud” in the elections of November 26.

Manuel Zelaya Rosales, coordinator of the Alliance, called on protests against “the vile murders, physical attacks, persecutions and aggressions carried out by the military, paramilitaries and police against the people who exercise their universal right to peaceful protest in defense of their vote.”

Through a statement, the Opposition coalition, which backed the presidential candidate Salvador Nasralla, expressed its support for peaceful protests and accused President Juan Orlando Hernández, re-elected according to the TSE, of being the main figure responsible for the recent events that have left at least 26 dead.

They called on the Honduran people to “actively protest” this Wednesday in front of the General Staff of the Armed Forces, located in Comayagüela. This Thursday the intention of the Alliance is to march toward the United States Embassy, after the U.S. government recognized Hernández’s triumph; while on Friday afternoon they have called for further street mobilizations across the country.

Nasralla, who lost by less than two percentage points after a long pause in the issuing of the electoral results, in which his advantage was suddenly and steadily eroded, traveled to Washington on Monday and met with the Secretary General of the Organization of American States (OAS), Luis Almagro, who considered that the most viable solution is to repeat the elections.