OFFICIAL VOICE OF THE COMMUNIST PARTY OF CUBA CENTRAL COMMITTEE
Petroglyphs previously discovered in Ambrosio Cave, Varadero, Cuba. Photo: Wondermondo.com

Members of the Pedro Borrás Group affiliated with Cuba’s Speleological Society recently discovered a cave containing indigenous drawings in the Sierra Maestra, to the south-east of Guisa, Granma Province.

According to Divaldo Gutiérrez Calvache MSc and Efrén Jaimez Salgado PhD, speaking to Granma, the discovery consists of a group of pre-Columbian petroglyphs (images created by removing part of a rock surface by incising, picking, carving, or abrading), the first to be found in this zone to date.

The experts noted that the discovery is of particular importance as all cave paintings found thus far in Granma province are located around the Cabo Cruz area.

Named Runel Cave, this is Cuba’s 302nd National Cave Art site, and features pictographs and petroglyphs intentionally etched on to cave chambers, caverns and rock formations by indigenous communities who inhabited the island before the arrival of Spanish conquistadores.

According to several experts, Cuba is currently the island nation with the most detailed and well preserved examples of such archeological and cultural manifestations in the region.